University of Pittsburgh
three small photographs depicting various religious icons

Department of Religious Studies

Events

Calendar of Events 2017-2018

Shrine to the goddess of good fortune, Inokashira Park, Tokyo

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All events are free and open to the public.

September October November December January February
March April
September 18, 2017

Workshop with Lucinda Ramberg on excerpts from her Given to the Goddess: South Indian Devadasis and the Sexuality of Religion

12:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center
Open to faculty and graduate students. PDF of advanced reading 1. PDF of advanced reading 2.

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Jeanette Jouili

September 18, 2017

Who and What is Sex for? Notes on Theogamy and the Sexuality of Religion

Lucinda E.G. Ramberg, associate professor of Anthropology and Program in Feminist, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

5:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center

Lucinda Ramberg is a medical and sociocultural anthropologist and interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersection of several fields including feminist, postcolonial and queer theories; religion and secularism; medicine and the body; and South Asia. In addition to her award-winning Given to the Goddess: South Indian Devadasis and the Sexuality of Religion (2014), Dr. Ramberg is coeditor of Conjugality and Beyond: Sexual Economy, State Regulation and the Marital Form in India with Srimati Basu (2015). She is currently researching a book on "We Were Always Buddhist: Dalit Conversion and Sexual Modernity."

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Jeanette Jouili

September 25, 2017

Neuroethics of Implantable Brain Stimulation Devices

PROGRAM

8:30a-3:00p, University Club

Keynote lecture:

Implanted: Brain Stimulation Devices: Ethical, Legal, and practical issues

Hank Greely, JD, director, Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences; director, Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society; co-chair, Neuroethics Division of the NIH BRAIN Initiative Multi-Council Working Group

Invasive brain stimulation devices have great, and to some extent, already demonstrated potential, but, like all technologies, they come with a set of challenges. This talk will talk about ethical challenges arising from the relationship between the patients, doctors, and companies; the impact such technology may have on our sense of being human and being the source of our individuality; the legal issues arising from possible unintended effects of invasive brain stimulation; and practical issues, ranging from FDA and reimbursement considerations to public fears. It will also try to situate this technology, and the issues it raises, in relation to similar emerging neurotechnologies.

Cosponsor with the University of Pittsburgh Brain Center, Center for Philosophy of Science, Center for Bioethics & Health Law; Humanities Center; Pitt Law; Pitt Medicine; Medical Humanities; PIND; Honors Cllege, and CMU Center for Ethics & Policy

September 28-29. 2017

From Madness ot Medicine in Japanese Culture

Sepember 28, 9:00a-5p, Gold Room, University Club
September 29, 9:00a-2:30p, Gold Room,University Club
Full program

This symposium brings together a group of scholars from across the disciplines of anthropology, film,history, literature, the performing arts, and religious studies to interrogate the meanings of mental illness as they have been defined and transformed throughout Japanese history. Our intention is to bring intensive scrutiny to the particular cultural case of Japan. We begin with the premise that mental illnesses are in part cultural constructs, ones that have been the subject of interest and concern from earliest times.

Cosponsored with the Asian Studies Center and the Department of East Asian Languges and Literatures. This conference is
supported by the Japan Iron and Steel Federation and Mitsubishi Japan Studies endowments at the University of Pittsburgh.

October 13, 2017

Europe's Muslim Question

9a-5p, 4130 WWPH
Program Contact: Dr. Jeanette Jouili

In this one-day symposium, invited scholars will discuss the “Muslim Question” in contemporary Europe. Since 9/11, European public debates have increasingly cast local Muslim populations
not only as a security threat, but also in opposition to the secular and liberal values considered foundational for a European identity.
This symposium will investigate how successive public debates (and the policies they have enabled) have deployed specific languages of liberalism and secularism as well as European
Muslim responses to these debates. Do they defend their presence by employing some of theliberal languages Europe champions as its own or do they seek to employ alternative languages
that refuse the discursive framework in which Islam has been placed?

Attendance is free and open to the public, though advanced registration is required. Symposium sessions will be made available for remote interactive videoconference participation. For more information, contact adelnore@pitt.edu.

October 16, 2017

Fighting with Faith: Jewish Military Chaplains and the American State

 

Ronit Stahl, fellow of Medical Ethics & Health Policy,Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvannia

 

12 noon-1:30p, 501 CL
Jewish Studies Program's Lunch Colloquium

 

The twentieth century, the American century, was a century of war and, since 1917, rabbis have officially served the American military as chaplains. What religious views did the military express and how did its religious commitments change over time? This talk examines how Jewish chaplains have participated in and critiqued the military's management of religion, showing how Jews harnessed state power to claim Judaism as an American religion, navigated tensions between communal and patriotic obligations, and wielded Judaism to challenge the American state.

 

Cosponsored with the Jewish Studies Program

 
October 16, 2017
 

Conscientious Objection and Professional Obligation: From Military Chaplains to Modern Medicine

 

Ronit Stahl, fellow of Medical Ethics & Health Policy,Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvannia

 

6 pm-7:30 pm, 501 CL   

Medical Humanities Monday Lecture

 

"Conscience clause” legislation has proliferated in recent years, extending the legal rights of health care professionals to cite their personal religious or moral beliefs as a reason to opt out of performing specific procedures or caring for particular patients. Reproductive health care, LGBT health care, and end-of-life care are the most common arenas for refusal of services. Legislative protection for conscientious objection in health care emerged at the height of conscientious objection to military service, but has diverged significantly since then. Like the military's medical corps, which must treat enemy combatants, military chaplains are non-combatants who often navigate conflicting duties to their professional calling and to country. This talk uses the experience of military chaplains -- the clergy who voluntarily enlisted in the armed forces as religious officers -- who grappled with conflicts of conscience during the Vietnam War to reconceptualize the relationship between conscientious objection and professional obligations and reconsider how medicine should handle religious refusals to provide care. 

 

Cosponsored with the Jewish Studies Program and Center for Bioethics & Health Law

November 11, 2017

Join Drs. Denova and Gordon (Religious Studies) and other Pitt faculty for a trip to the Cleveland Museum of Art. Check out the temporary exhibition called "Gods and Heroes" and tour the museum's rich permanent collection of art and artifacts from around the world.

November 30, 2017

Angry Subjects: In/Civility, Christian Nationalism, and the Paranoid Position in an Age of Trump

Ann Pellegrini, professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, New York University

6:00-8:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center

Ann Pellegrini is professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University. In addition to her ground-breaking Love and Sin with Janet Jakobsen (2003, 2004), Dr. Pellegrini is author of Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race (1997); coauthor of “You Can Tell Just By Looking” and 20 Other Myths About LGBT Life and People with Michael Bronski and Michael Amico (2013); coeditor of Secularisms with Janet Jakobsen (2008) and Queer Theory and the Jewish Question with Daniel Boyarin and Daniel Itzkovitz (2003). Dr. Pellegrini coedits the Sexual Cultures Series (NYU Press) and is currently completing a book on “queer structures of religious feeling.”

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Rachel Kranson

December 1, 2017

Workshop with Ann Pellegrini on “What’s Wrong with Tolerance” from her Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance

10:00-11:15a, 602 CL, Humanities Center
Open to faculty and graduate students. Download PDF of advanced readings here.

Ann Pellegrini is professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University. In addition to her ground-breaking Love and Sin with Janet Jakobsen (2003, 2004), Dr. Pellegrini is author of Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race (1997); coauthor of “You Can Tell Just By Looking” and 20 Other Myths About LGBT Life and People with Michael Bronski and Michael Amico (2013); coeditor of Secularisms with Janet Jakobsen (2008) and Queer Theory and the Jewish Question with Daniel Boyarin and Daniel Itzkovitz (2003). Dr. Pellegrini coedits the Sexual Cultures Series (NYU Press) and is currently completing a book on “queer structures of religious feeling.”

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Rachel Kranson

January
February
March 26, 2018

Jewish-Muslim Alliances and Rivalries in Europe: My Experiences with the Salaam-Schalom Initiative, an Interfaith activist Group Standing for a Peaceful Co-existence between Jews, Muslims, and Allies

Armin Langer

4:30p, 501 CL

April 12-14, 2018

Call for Papers: Symposium on "The Logic of Racial Practice: Embodied Cognition, Habitus, and Implicit Bias."CFP details

Deadline for Submissions (500 word abstract and 2-3 page CV): December 10, 2017 to Dr. Brock Bahler.

Organizers:
Dr. Brock Bahler, Department of Religious Studies, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Gabby Yearwood, Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh

Events Archive

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