University of Pittsburgh
three small photographs depicting various religious icons

Department of Religious Studies

Events

Calendar of Events 2016-2017

Shrine to the goddess of good fortune, Inokashira Park, Tokyo

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All events are free and open to the public.

September October November December January February
March April

September 19, 2016

Narrative Psychiatry: Storytelling in the Clinical Environment

Bradley Lewis, MD, PhD, associate professor, New York University

5:00p, 602 Cathedral of Learning, Humanities Center

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

Septembr 29, 2016

Religious Diversity and the Presidential Elections, a roundtable discussion with members of the Department of Religous Religious Studies: Rebecca Denova, Jeanette Jouili, Paula Kane, and Rachel Kranson. Moderated by Clark Chilson

6:00p, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

October 14, 2016

Seminar with Steven Justice, Chancellor's Professor of English, UC Berkeley

12:00p, 602 Cathredal of Learning

For more information: medren.pitt.edu or jwaldon@pitt.edu

Cosponsored with the Medieval and Rennaisance Studies Program and the Jewish Studies Program

A Book Celebration for Ryan McDermontt and Hannah Johnson

Featuring a response by Steven Justice, Chancellor's Professor, UC Berkeley, "Historicism (A Eulogy)"

4:00p, 501 Cathrdral of Learning

Cosponsored with the Medieval and Rennaisance Studies Program and the Jewish Studies Program

October 31, 2016

The Sacrament of Swallowing: the Intersection of Swallowing Disorders and Religious Practice

Paula Leslie, professor of Communication Science & Disorders, University of Pittsburgh

5:00p, 602 Cathedral of Learnng, Humanities Center

When we think of the clash of religious values and medical care, our thoughts typically go to dramatic, topics like the refusal of blood transfusions or whether abortion is acceptable following rape. This presentation will describe how a non-religious speech-language pathologist and a theologian connected over quite different concerns: the ubiquity of the swallow, the distress of dementia, and the transference of grace. Dementia is a condition affecting 47.5 million people world-wide, and is one of many conditions that affect our ability to eat, drink, and swallow. Impairments in the ability to swallow drastically affect the lives of individuals not only physically, but socially and spiritually.

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

November 14, 2016

Turning Points in Pennsylvania’s Disability Rights History: Pennhurst and Deinstitutionalization

5:00-8:00p, Barco Law Building, Room 20 (ground floor)

The documentary I Go Home, produced by WITF, tells the story of Pennhurst through the eyes of a long-time resident. Panel discussion will feature Tom Gilhool, renowned disability rights attorney who was involved in landmark cases, Jim Conroy, PhD, and Jane Searle of the Pennhurst Memorial and Preservation Alliance. Reception to follow.

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

December 5, 2016

'Recurrent Losers Unite': Evidence-Based Activism and Pregnancy

Olga Kuchinskaya, assistant professor of Communication, University of Pittsbugh

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

January 14, 2017

Spoken Word, Faith Communities, and Social Justice

All day, Pittsburgh Theological Semnary

Keynote by Erika D. Gault. Dr. Gault is an an ordained minister and an assistant professor of history and religion at Hilbert College in Hamburg, N.Y. Her scholarly work focuses on the intersection of religious history, technology, and urban black life in post-industrial America. Dr. Gault alsoperforms with the Buffalo-based poetry slam team, Njozi Poets. In 2011 and 2014 she toured with North America's largest spoken word concert, When Sisters Speak. Gault is the 2012 first place winner of the Toronto International Poetry Slam, the first woman to hold this honor. She placed seventh out of 60 spoken word poets across North America in the Ontario International Poetry Slam in 2012. Gault is the co-convener of Western New York's largest poetry slam competition, the Buffalo Niagara International Poetry Slam. In 2013, Gault co-wrote and produced a play of poetry entitled, Ain't She Brave, which received four stars in the Buffalo News and which has been produced in New York City as part of The New York International Fringe Festival (2014) and at the Black Theatre Troupe in Phoenix (2015).

Following the keynote, breakout workshopinclude:
· Slam poetry
· The historic role of jazz in social action
· The power of preaching to inspire response to injustice
· The history of the civil rights moment as seen through songs and photography
· The organization of an ad hoc choir

A Community Meal, followed by a an Open Mic, anchored by Jasiri X, a local hip-hop artist, and Erika Gault, as well as the Hope Academy of East Liberty Presbyterian Church, a low-cost arts organization for community youth. With the intent of having the day create "a slow burn rather than a one-day spark," the artifacts created and shared will become part of an online resource to be created (and maintained by PTS) to support participating individuals and groups to continue conversations and collaborations for justice.

Sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Health Law,
University of Pittsburgh

February 6, 2017

Queer Theology and Social Transformation: Points of Contact, Points of Conflict

Jay Michaelson, LGBTQ activist, columnist for The Daily Beast and affiliated assistant professor, Chicago Theological Seminary

5:00p, 501 CL
Reception to follow

PODCAST

Dr. Jay Michaelson is the author of six books and over three hundred articles on religion, sexuality, law, and contemplative practice. He is a columnist for The Daily Beast and the Forward newspaper, and is a frequent commentator on NPR, MSNBC, and online. In his ‘other’ career, Jay is an affiliated assistant professor at Chicago Theological Seminary, teaches meditation in Jewish and Theravadan Buddhist lineages, and holds nondenominational rabbinic ordination. Dr. Michaelson's books include the bestselling God vs. Gay? The Religious Case for Equality, and the landmark report Redefining Religious Liberty: The Covert Campaign against Civil Rights.

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Adam Shear

February 6, 2017

On Diagnosing the Secular Rituals of Aging

Philip Kao, visiting assistant professor of Anthropology, Univerisity of Pittsburgh

5:00p, 602 Cathedral of Learning, Humanities Center

This talk draws from the speaker’s recent fieldwork in an American Midwest “nursing home.”  Several ethnographic examples are summoned to exhibit the nature of sociality among residents and caregivers.  The talk’s objective is to explore how an ethnography of ontogeny—from the standpoint of old age rather than earlier in the life-span—reveals important aspects of historicity (cf. E. Husserl, C. Toren) and personhood.  After a brief analysis of what an anthropology of (late-life) human development can add to our scientific understanding of human being and ‘becoming’, the speaker turns to another ethnographic example in order to assess the nature of secular rituals attending the elderly in standard long-term care facilities.

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

February 27, 2017

Imagining Dementia: Slow Death, Suicide, or Social Transformation

Rebecca Garden, associate professor of Bioethics and Humanities, Upstate Medical University-SUNY

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

March 1, 2017

Postponed until Fall Term 2017-TBD

Workshop with Ann Pellegrini on “What’s Wrong with Tolerance” from her Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance

12:00 Noon, 602 CL, Humanities Center
Open to faculty and graduate students. Download PDF of advanced readings here.

Ann Pellegrini is professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University. In addition to her ground-breaking Love and Sin with Janet Jakobsen (2003, 2004), Dr. Pellegrini is author of Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race (1997); coauthor of “You Can Tell Just By Looking” and 20 Other Myths About LGBT Life and People with Michael Bronski and Michael Amico (2013); coeditor of Secularisms with Janet Jakobsen (2008) and Queer Theory and the Jewish Question with Daniel Boyarin and Daniel Itzkovitz (2003). Dr. Pellegrini coedits the Sexual Cultures Series (NYU Press) and is currently completing a book on “queer structures of religious feeling.”

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Rachel Kranson

March 1, 2017

Postponed until Fall Term 2017-TBD

Angry Subjects: In/Civility, Christian Nationalism, and the Paranoid Position in an Age of Trump

Ann Pellegrini, professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, New York University

5:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center
All welcome. Reception to follow.

In her now-classic 1981 essay “The Uses of Anger,” Audre Lorde commends anger as a force that allows us to attend to histories of structural oppression. In particular, she urges women of color to name and speak their anger aloud and challenges white feminists to hear it without getting defensive. “The angers between women will not kill us," Lorde writes, "if we can articulate them with precision, if we listen to the content of what is said with at least as much intensity as we defend ourselves against the manner of saying. When we turn from anger we turn from insight, saying we will accept only the designs already known, deadly and safely familiar.” Instead of turning from anger, we need, in her words, “to stand still, to listen to its rhythms, to learn within it.” Meeting Lorde’s charge—to tarry with anger—remains no less urgent and no less discomforting today than it was when she issued her call in 1981. A call to and for anger may even seem counter-intuitive and counter-productive in the age of Trump. Shouldn't we want less rancor, fewer angry words in public? This paper returns to Lorde as a resource for the present-day and as a retort, as well, to those who bemoan the loss of civility in U.S. political discourse. Focusing on concrete case studies—and drawing on the resources of queer of color critique, psychoanalysis, and affect studies—this talk traces how norms of civility have worked to encode white Christian nationalism. For which subjects and which bodies, was anger ever permissible and civility ever an achievable ideal?

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Rachel Carson

March 15, 2017

Breaking Barriers and Constructing Hospitable Communities for Individuals Across a Range of Abilities

Debbie Creamer, author of Disability and Christian Theology: Embodied Limits and Constructive Possibilities (2009)

Following her presentation “Hospitality and Disability,” Debbie Creamer will engage with members of the DSRG and participants from PTS, the School of Social Work, and the Department of Religious Studies, in a discussion focused on the barriers frequently erected by congregations and practices of worship, and the roles congregations and communities can instead play in creating hospitable environments for those with a range of disabilities."

Time TBA, Pittsburgh Theology Seminary

Part of a yearlong series on "Embodied Diversity: Diverse Abilities, Disabilities, Culture, and Community," sponsored by the Center for Bioethics, Disability Studies Reading Group (DSRG), Departments of English and Communications, and others

March 16, 2017

Religion and Gay Marriage: Do They Have To Be At Odds?

3:00p, Barco Law Building/Teplitz Memorial Moot Courtroom

David Givens (ABD, Religious Studies and project director, Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, GSPH),winner of the 2017 Tolerance Dialogue Scholarship for "The Opportunities and Impediments of Tolerance,” joins the ToleranceMeans Dialogue on "Religion and Gay Marriage: Do They Have To Be At Odds".

March 20, 2017

International Day of the Francophonie 2017

Readings by Leïla Marouane, French-Algerian writer and journalist, from her Vie Sexuelle d’un Islamiste à Paris [The Sexual Life of an Islamist in Paris] (2007).

2:00p, 501 Cahtedral of Learning

Organized by the Department of French and Italian with support from Religious Studies.

March 27, 2017

Alternative Medicine

Rafael Campo, visiting professor in Medical Humanities
Physician and poet, Harvard Medical School

Time and venue TBA

Part of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law "Medical Humanities Mondays" Series

March 30, 2017

Queering Religion: The Student Perspective

A panel discussion with Pitt students and alumni sharing their experiences of the intersection of religiosity and queer identity in modern life. Special focus on experiences at Pitt.

6:000p, 602 CL, Humanities Center
Pizza and refreshments at 5:30p

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Ben Gordon

April 20, 2017

Religious Studies Student Research Presentations on the "Pittsburgh Torah Scrolls Project"

11:00a–12:30p, William Pitt Union, Kurzman Room

September 18, 2017

Workshop with Lucinda Ramberg on excerpts from her Given to the Goddess: South Indian Devadasis and the Sexuality of Religion

Open to faculty and graduate students. Please check back for PDF of advanced readings.

12:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Jeanette Jouili

September 18, 2017

Who and What is Sex for? Notes on Theogamy and the Sexuality of Religion

Lucinda E.G. Ramberg, associate professor of Anthropology and Program in Feminist, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

5:00p, 602 CL, Humanities Center

Lucinda Ramberg is a medical and sociocultural anthropologist and interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersection of several fields including feminist, postcolonial and queer theories; religion and secularism; medicine and the body; and South Asia. In addition to her award-winning Given to the Goddess: South Indian Devadasis and the Sexuality of Religion (2014), Dr. Ramberg is coeditor of Conjugality and Beyond: Sexual Economy, State Regulation and the Marital Form in India with Srimati Basu (2015). She is currently researching a book on "We Were Always Buddhist: Dalit Conversion and Sexual Modernity."

Part of the Religious Studies "Queering Religion" Series. Cosponsored by the Provost's Year of the Humanities, Humanities Center, University Honors College, Asian Studies Center and Indo-Pacific Council, Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, and Programs in Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies and Jewish Studies. Contact Jeanette Jouili

 

Events Archive

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